The Timeless Being

First of all, think of the origin of the word ‘universe’:

The word universe derives from the Old French word Univers, which in turn derives from the Latin word universum.[10] The Latin word was used by Cicero and later Latin authors in many of the same senses as the modern English word is used.[11] The Latin word derives from the poetic contraction Unvorsum — first used by Lucretius in Book IV (line 262) of his De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things) — which connects un, uni (the combining form of unus’, or “one”) with vorsum, versum (a noun made from the perfect passive participle of vertere, meaning “something rotated, rolled, changed”). An alternative interpretation of unvorsum is “everything rotated as one” or “everything rotated by one”. A term for “universe” in ancient Greece was τὸ πᾶν (tò pán, The All, Pan (mythology)).

And an ancient religion system:

Panentheism (from Greek πᾶν (pân) “all”; ἐν (en) “in”; and θεός (theós) “God”; “all-in-God”) is a belief system which posits that the divine exists (be it a monotheistic God, polytheistic gods, or an eternal cosmic animating force), interpenetrates every part of nature and timelessly extends beyond it. Panentheism is differentiated from pantheism, which holds that the divine is not a distinct being or beings but is synonymous with the universe.[1] Simply put, in pantheism, the divine is the whole; however, in panentheism, the whole is in the divine. This means that the universe in the first formulation is practically the whole itself. In the second formulation, the universe and the divine are not ontologically equivalent. In panentheism, God is viewed as the eternal animating force behind the universe. Some versions suggest that the universe is nothing more than the manifest part of God. In some forms of panentheism, the cosmos exists within God, who in turn “pervades” or is “in” the cosmos. While pantheism asserts that God and the universe are coextensive, panentheism claims that God is greater than the universe.

Finally:

In Vajrayana Buddhism, the Adi-Buddha, or Adibuddha (Tibetan: Dang-po’i sangs-rgyas), is the “Primordial Buddha.” The term refers to a self-emanating, self-originating Buddha, present before anything else existed. Samantabhadra, Samantabhadri and Vajradhara are the best known names for Adi-Buddha, though there are others. Adi-Buddha is usually depicted as dark blue.

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